Geoenergy

  GEOENERGY, SECURES ITS ENERGY FROM SUSTAINABLE SOURCES SUCH AS THE GROUND, AQUIFERS, LAKES, RIVERS AND WASTE WATER/SEWAGE NETWORKS.

GEOENERGY, SECURES ITS ENERGY FROM SUSTAINABLE SOURCES SUCH AS THE GROUND, AQUIFERS, LAKES, RIVERS AND WASTE WATER/SEWAGE NETWORKS.

In stark contrast to combustion systems, geoenergy, secures its energy from sustainable sources such as the ground, aquifers, lakes, rivers, sea and waste water/sewage networks. This makes it both environmentally-friendly, secure and cheaper.  

Geoenergy is a well-proven energy technology and uses energy on your doorstep without the need for expensive and damaging long-distance transportation. The limited amount of electricity used in driving the heat and circulation pumps is, in Sweden for example, completely free from combustion processes and, therefore, combustion-related pollutants and this means greenhouse gas free geoenergy. Other Nordic countries are swiftly following suit.

Apart from generating thermal energy efficiently, geoenergy also facilitates the efficient seasonal storage of heating and cooling. This means the need for less energy production over the year and, consequently, lower energy costs. During the Summer, heat generated by the building’s cooling system can be pumped down into the borehole battery and during the Winter this heat can be deployed for heating the building.

By balancing the temperature of the borehole battery, the building can be furnished with “free-cooling” during the Summer. Only a circulation pump is required to transport the cooling to the building. This means that for every 1 KWh or electricity used to drive the circulation pump, around 40 KWh of cooling effect is delivered to the building.

  TYPICAL GROUND BATTERY PROFILES, DESIGNED BATTERY TEMPERATURE °C

TYPICAL GROUND BATTERY PROFILES, DESIGNED BATTERY TEMPERATURE °C

Geoenergy is a low-temperature heating and high temperature cooling system. This means low (often zero) energy losses during its distribution. Low temperature distribution systems have the inherent capacity for absorbing thermal energy from buildings and processes on it’s route. This is particularly valuable in geoenergy district heating schemes, where even low temperature emissions can be injected into the network for use in buildings in other parts of the network. Traditional high-temperature, district heating schemes are limited to the recovery of extremely high energy emissions normally associated with industrial processes and also experience high energy losses during distribution.